Müllerthal Fall break

Luxemburg’s Müllerthal region is where we found ourselves last week: a little nature break in an impressive geological and green mini paradise nicknamed Little Switzerland….

We stayed in Hotel Meyer in Beaufort with start of many hiking tours and Beaufort’s renaissance castle within walking distance.

Beaufort Luxemburg
view on castle coming from village

 

Leading hiking track in the region is the Müllerthal trail, 112 km long and composed of three main routes linking the several villages and their natural and cultural highlights. These three routes are all connected however can just as well be hiked seperately and, if feet are not weary enough, another four extra tours complete the region’s wanderlust Erlebnis.

First day of our tip we explored Beaufort and walked part of the b1 hike starting at castle.

Beaufort Luxemburg

Beaufort Luxemburg

 

Beaufort Müllerthal

 

Beaufort Luxemburg

Day two was all rainy and windy, die-hards wouldn’t let this stop them from hiking; not that fanatic though 😉  we took a trip to nearby Trier to indulge us in warm coffee, chocolates, some shopping and local beers.

 

Day three and already final day of our nature break…sun present again so we decided to make most of this day starting off with an early morning walk in neighbouring Grundhof. With moist and rain of previous day still in the air and soil (and my bones) this gave a strange mystical feel to the forest.

Grundhof Luxemburg

From where we stood, pointing the camera in the other direction gave the below photo, and no…not a b&w one…glad Halloween was over, tiny bit creepy!

Grundhof Luxemburg

After checking out off the hotel we headed to Berdorf and saved best for last…

Berdorf Müllerthal Luxemburg

Berdorf Müllerthal Luxemburg

Berdorf Müllerthal Luxemburg

Along the trail stairs and ladders help to conquer the height differences…or you can take the more adventurous path like this young lady (not me in pic)

Berdorf Müllerthal Luxemburg

Typical are the rock formations and narrows…curious how nature formed such a mind-blowing landscape?

Millions of years ago, Müllerthal region was covered by a large sea. Over time, however, a thick layer of sand covered the clay underground. When the sea receded and water starting flowing over land, the relatively soft sandstone eroded, eventually forming a landscape of stream-filled valleys and cliffs. However, when water filters through the porous sandstone and reaches the watertight layer of clay beneath, it builds up and is trapped resulting in destabilizing the rocks around the valley edges, causing parts of sandstone to slip down the valley or break off completely.

Berdorf Luxemburg

Pretty sure that’s one of our ancestors coming peeping out of the rock…anybody else see the human head shape, or is it just me?

Berdorf Mullerthal Luxemburg

Berdorf Mullerthal Luxemburg
the Hohllay rock formation in Berdorf

Berdorf Luxemburg

Mullerthal trail Luxemburg

 

Mullerthal trail Luxemburg

Mullerthal trail Luxemburg

Mullerthal trail Luxemburg

Thirteen years since our previous visit…

Mullerthal trail Luxemburg
little trip down memory lane…

and yes…it’s still impressive!

Mullerthal trail Luxemburg

 

Ingrid

xxx

 

Visit Müllerthal

Müllerthal trail

Hotel Meyer

Auberge Rustique – cosy restaurant in Beaufort

Trier Tourism

 

 

Fall: return of the fungi

however don’t be alarmed 😉

Now that days are getting colder and shorter and the  soil is covered under a multi-textured carpet of soft rustling leaves little wonders carefully show their heads…whether leaning against a tree, feeding on dead wood or in full spotlight…I always stop to admire these wonderful fungi in all shapes and colours.

fungi

Studies showed that what controls forest diversity is not the trees but the fungi that interact with them, some are visible to us, some on a microscopic scale below ground and hidden from sight.

Join me on this walk through the park, eyes on the ground…

fungi

fungi

fungi

fungi

fungi

We have so mushroom for a fungi like you…

 

Watch your step on your next walk in nature…little recyclers at work…

Till next time!

Ingrid

xxx

 

 

 

Tervuren pop-up memorial…

Tervuren poppy installation

Until 11th of November the former Panquin barracks at Tervuren, Belgium, near Sonian forest, are transformed into a World War I memorial and peace site.

Tervuren poppy installation

 

Landscape architects Sven Vangodtsenhoven and Hans Tuerlinckx of Art-Ex designed a 100-metre long path that consists of two parallel walls of stacked wood logs. All this with the intention to create the impression of a trench when walking through. Both ends of the logs are painted vibrant red with a little black dot, referring to the remembrance poppy and symbolising the many victims of the Great War.

Tervuren poppy installation

Into the niches between the logs, messages of hope and peace can be put, though we didn’t see that many at our recent visit…did they get blown away by the wind…who knows? Still two and a half months left to fill up the blanks with messages!

 

Tervuren poppy installation
path towards barracks and Tervuren city centre

At ‘Hoefijzerplein’ (the square has the shape of a horseshoe) the path is surrounded by a mowing field of grain and ‘popping-up’ poppies, a mix of styled artificial ones and the real ones. At the end, the path is slightly elevated overlooking St-Hubertus chapel and the ruins of the former ducal palace as well as Tervuren’s park and ponds.

Tervuren poppy installation

 

Fyi, four years after the barracks were abandonned the site will get a new destination: the buildings of architectural and historical interest will be respectfully restored and integrated in a multi-functional zone: housing units, hotel, green area and room for cultural events,…

As the site borders Tervuren park and ponds you have an excellent excuse to have that short, or longer, nature walk…

 

Tervuren park

Proximity of the Royal Museum for Central Africa is an asset. The site has been under restoration for years but we’re near the finish line as it will re-open its doors 9th of December 2018. Until then, no one keeps you from admiring the stunning neo-classical style building and adjoining gardens!

Africa museum Tervuren

Hope you enjoyed this little stroll through Tervuren, where nature meets city, past meets future and green meets red 😉

Ingrid

xxx

 

ps Special thanks to Eddy, @edandhiscamera on IG, my travel companion for the day and fellow photographer.

Visit Tervuren

Tervuren Park

Africa museum Tervuren

Sea x art

Don’t shoot me but I’m not a musea person, no matter the subject…can’t help it…However, I know what I like and don’t like: I like admiring buildings and can appreciate architecture whether modern or historical, I like colours and patterns, texture and there has to be that wild card that ignites the fantasy. Pull the objects out of a building, place them in nature or outside somewhere and you’ll have my attention.

Our recent trip to Ostend, Queen of Belgian seaside resorts, rewarded us with ‘open-fresh (though my husband persisted ‘cold’) air’ artworks to admire when strolling through town.

Beaufort is a triennial art project that extends along the entire Belgian coastline covering 15 resorts each having their own identity. It is a project that was first launched in 2003 in which the sea very often plays the main role. Furthermore every participating artist comes from a country that borders on the sea.

Beaufort Ostend

In Ostend there are three different Beaufort-artworks to discover however during our walk on the western strekdam we stumbled onto the Monument for a Wullok by Stief Desmet. A wullok always holds some kind a magic and as a kid holding it to your ear, thinking you could hear the sea and what lied beyond…wow…however some things stay secret and magical, reason for the artist to return the bronze sculpture to the sea and let time, the salty air and sand transform it.

The Crystal Ship

Together with the Beaufort art project Ostend is also home to the Crystal Ship open-air art exhibition. An international group of visual artists (more than 50) transform existing structures with their creative interventions and murals. In this concept of ‘public street art festival’ it is the largest one in Europe!

This visit our eye fell on the works of Telmo&Miel at Nieuwpoortsesteenweg.

The Crystal Ship

Even without big events or festivals like these, Belgian seaside always has something to offer to please the eye if you would ever get bored of wave or people watching…

The picturesque ‘Duinenkerkje’ at Mariakerke/Ostend is the final rest place for painter Ensor where he lies peacefully…altough…surrounded by lively sheep and a colourful rabbit…

Ostend

Ostend

And in neighbouring De Haan some beautiful romantic sculptures keep you company on your evening walk…

De Haan

De Haan

De Haan

For whatever we lose (like a you or a me) it’s always ourselves we find in the sea

(Cummings)

‘Sea’ you soon…

Ingrid

xxx

Ostend

Beaufort 2018

The Crystal Ship

Belgian Coast tourist info

Sintra: life in technicolor…

Pena Palace Sintra

In the Lisbon series there is one more ‘must see’ I want to tell you about, or not…maybe Sintra should be kept more secret as it is already overrun by tourists all coming to admire the city’s cultural and architectural wonders. Its natural and historical value make Sintra in its whole a UNESCO World Heritage Site, like I said, a ‘must see’…

 

Sintra is located 25 km outside Lisbon city centre and is set against the lush pine-covered hills of the Serra de Sintra. Easily accessible from Lisbon Rossio train station in about 40 minutes and included if you have a Lisboa card.

Upon arrival shuttle services await you to bring you to all the main sites, however we chose to walk to the village centre. An easy walkable path offering views on the National Palace with the characteristic chimneys, colourful stands with local handicrafts and an iron throne, well, with a little imagination…

Sintra Portugal

Early mornings can be foggy in Sintra, don’t worry, sunny ‘sol’ does her best and by noon you’ll have clear blue sky!

 

Sintra city centre Portugal

In the above picture, all the way up, op top of the foggy hills, are the ruins of the moorish castle. We’ll get to them later…

Sintra city hall
view on Sintra city hall

First stop for us however was Pena Palace and its gardens. From the city centre we took a tuk tuk that dropped us off at Parque da Pena entrance and from there we made our way up to the Palace, still a serious climb on often cobbled paths!

tuk tuk Sintra Portugal

Some piece of advice…if you are not interested in castle interiors you do not have to get in line, which can be a very, very long queue…the exterior grounds are perfectly accessible with your entrance ticket without waiting in line or just ask for the cheaper park/outside combination…wish someone had told us that upfront, it certainly wasn’t mentioned at the ticket office…though would have saved us a lot of time! And yes, some of the terraces are only accessible from the inside, however is it worth an hour and a half queuing? That is up to you to decide…

Pena Palace Sintra

Sintra Pena Palace

The palace is a dazzling piece of extravagant and astonishing architecture, where technicolor meets mythology and of course, being in Portugal, tiles are never far away! Not that it was always like that…the hilltop used to be home for a monastery. After the abolition of religious orders in Portugal it was abandoned and King Ferdinand II acquired the grounds in a public auction. So the story goes he was a bit jealous of Neuschwanstein castle in Bavaria and commisioned Baron von Eschwege to build him his own dream palace opera-inspired (he later marries opera singer Elise Hensler) and saw to a forestry landscaped garden to hide away in. I’d say mission accomplished!

 

 

Pena Palace Sintra tiles

Meanwhile in city centre…

Sintra moorish walls

I promised blue skies, didn’t I? Fog has cleared and you can see them now…next stop, the moorish walls…

The Castelo dos Mouros was established during the 9th century by the North African Moors to guard the town of Sintra however archeological excavations and studies of the artefacts around 1995 even traced back occupation of the castle slopes to 5000 B.C. by neolithic communities…this place breathes history! In the 19th century King Ferdinand II acquired the castle that had become a ruin by then and converted it into the romantic style of that century through exuberant planting and reconstruction though keeping a certain medieval ruin charm.

Not sure if I would recommend to climb the longer part of the walls with very small children or if you are afraid of heights…the passage is sometimes narrow and there is not always a safety railing…

 

Sintra Moors Castle

The ruin walls offer phenomenal views on Sintra and its surroundings, however, like I said, watch your step, as not everywhere a railing…

Sintra Moors Castle

Sintra Portugal Moors castle
Sintra City Centre shot from the moorish walls

Tired feet and back, hence the tuk tuk back to village…smooth ride and friendly helpful driver, were all I needed to recover and smile again!

tuk tuk Sintra Portugal

There’s plenty more to see in Sintra, in fact, if you want to explore thoroughly and at ease, it’s probably best to spend the night, more ‘must see’ attractions are the Quinta Regaleira, Palácio de Monserrate, Palácio Nacional de Sintra, Convento dos Capuchos,… just check the local tourist office website or office.

Adeus Sintra, until we meet again!

Ingrid

xxx

Sintra Tourist info

Park and National Palace Pena

Moorish castle

we stayed in Airbnb Inglesinhas5 and you can read more on our Lisbon adventures herehere or here

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Belém Lisbon: fantastic beasts and where to find them

Belém

One of Lisbon’s many jewels, Belém lies peacefully, well if you ignore the tourists, alongside Tagus river…how different it must have been during the Age of Discovery with explorers impatiently embarking onto their long voyages to unknown destinations and adventures, and with it the booming trade bringing the world to Belém…

Belém
Tagus, Bridge and Cristo Rei statue

Belém

No exploring on an empty stomach…skipping this bakery and their well-known pastéis would be a capital crime! Pastéis de nata exist all over the world, only these ones, manufactured following an old, and till today, secret recipe from the monastery can be called ‘pastéis de Belém’…did you know that according to Portugese tradition a bride who eats a pastéis will never take off her ring?!

Belem
Mosteiro dos Jeronimos

Undisputed leader when it comes to tourist queues…the Unesco-listed monastery, but so worth it! Built for the glory of God, king Manuel I and explorer Vasco da Gama this spectacular building shows an exuberant mix of styles, mixing religious, gothic and manueline/maritime elements. Construction took almost a century and it was built on the site, so the story goes, where Vasco da Gama took off on his voyage to India in 1497. Monks of the St Jerome order provided spirital guidance to all explorers following da Gama’s footsteps and adventures linking the monastery forever to Portugese maritime history…seems only right then that both king Manuel I and Vasco da Gama found their final resting place here where it all began.

Belém

Belém

Belém

Belém

Belém

Fantastic beasts and where to find them…a place for spiritual guidance and fantasy…

But it’s still a monastery…

Belém

Belém

Another Unesco monument, Torre de Belém was built to keep port entrance safe and most often it was the last building of their homeland the explorers saw for many, many months or years sailing off. Originally standing in the centre of the Tejo estuary the flow changes made the fortress stand on the river bank now, making it more accessible.

Belém

Belém
smaller sails, though still a fun and colourful adventure!

From Torre de Belém a pleasant riverbank walk leads to Padrao dos Descobrimentos…

Belém

 

Belém

Designed as a caravel overlooking the sea with Henry the navigator in its prow, this concrete structure was built to mark the 500-year-death of said navigator. Actually it was re-built as another version made of wood and iron in 1940 already existed as part of the Portugese World Exhibition.

Both ramps together show 32 figures that have put their mark some way or another during the Age of Discovery, think cartographers, navigators, warriors, artists, etc…

Many more interesting things to see and do in Belém of course…just check tourist office for more info!

As for accessability, from city centre just take tram or train, our Airbnb Inglesinhas 5 being located close to Cais do Sodre station, train was a fast and easy option.

Hope you enjoyed this little escape to Belém!

Adeus!

Ingrid

 

Airbnb Inglesinhas 5

Lisbon Tourist info

Visit Belém